World War II
Troop Carrier Commmand
52nd Troop Carrier Wing
61st Troop Carrier Group 14th Troop Carrier Squadron
15th Troop Carrier Squadron
53rd Troop Carrier Squadron
59th Troop Carrier Squadron
Table of Members
(Click Here)
This is a study of a unit from the U.S. Army's Troop Carrier Command in World War II. Who the members were, where they came from, what they did, what happened to them, the milestones in their lives during a very intense 3-year period of history. These are the stories about our fathers, grandfathers, great-grandfathers, uncles, great uncles, coming from very different backgrounds and experiences, who were thrown together in a short period of time, to congeal into a unit supporting the ground-pounding fighting men. The brutal enemies in World War II were pushed back and defeated step-by-step, mile-by-mile, by the fighting men on the ground. Everything else done was in support of them. Strategic bombing did not win the war, but it surely degraded the enemy’s ability to fight the ground forces. Naval attacks did not win the war, but it surely degraded the enemy's ability to supply materiel and fighting men to the front. Troop Carrier Command did not win the war, but it did deliver fighting men behind the enemy lines, it did deliver ammunition, gasoline, food, weapons, medical supplies, clothing, communications equipment, jeeps, tents, boots, body bags, more medical supplies, more food, more ammunition, and even horses, donkeys, and pi- geon food - to name just a few items. It was a global aerial trucking company. They intentionally flew only when the weather was decent - so when it was decent they flew and flew until exhaustion. And when the weather became bad - it killed a lot of them. Troop Carrier Command - when not training for proficiency or a planned mission - kept busy hauling, with the intention of never flying empty, hauled the wounded - both walking and litter-bound, hauled prisoners of war, hauled VIPs, and hauled and hauled. Honor Roll
(Click Here)
Daily War Diary
(Click Here)
Photographs
(Click Here)
Supporting Documents
(Click Here)
The Donald E King Diary
(Click Here)
The Aircraft
(Click Here)
The Gerald A Parker Diary
(Click Here)
Your Grandfather's MOS
(Click Here)
I had to do this. Here I am, 67 years old in 2017, trying to learn about my father-just like you are at this website trying to learn about your father, uncle, brother, grandfather, or great-grandfather. All of my years of self-interest in my own life came back to hit me (very hard) when my father passed away in 1997. I heard tidbits from my father about his flying time, but never dwelled much on anything else of what was going on in the early part of his life. When I discovered in 2010 that the actual aircraft my father flew in World War II still existed in flying condition – and could be found within a 2-day drive to Texas – I had to learn more. I attended the last 2 reunions of his flying squadron before they disbanded the practice due to "downsizing by the grim reaper" and had the great pleasure of hearing the stories and compliments about so many of those squadron men: your fathers, uncles, brothers, grand-fathers, great grand-fathers. What fine men they were. What brave men they were. What skilled men they were. And for a few minutes periodical- ly, what scared men they were. I am not keeping my newly-gained knowledge to myself - I am sharing it with you. I am paying for this website on my own dime, solely for you to learn about these heroes. Mid-America Flight Museum
(Click Here)
The Locations
(Click Here)
Acknowledgements and Disclaimers
(Click Here)